the World’s Most Exclusive Oven

Since 1986, in-the-know designers and high-end homeowners have coveted the Gaggenau 300 Series 36-inch wall oven. Its unique design can fit four chickens at once, and a single-piece quadruple-glazed door retains heat inside the oven.

Its price? If you have to ask, it isn’t for you. But even those who can afford the 300 Series can’t always get one.
That’s because of supply and demand. Unlike mass-produced appliances, Gaggenau builds each 300 Series oven by hand in a factory in Lipsheim, France. The door is made from a single piece of metal, and the interior is coated in a proprietary cobalt mixture.

The factory can only create so many ovens in a year, so would-be customers can’t simply head down to a local appliance store and pick one up.

Consider the Gaggenau 300 Series the Birkin bag of home appliances: Coveted, exclusive, and hard to find.

This year, in honor of the German brand’s 333rd anniversary, Gaggenau is making some major updates to the 300 Series. The all-new EB 333 wall oven gets a new digital control panel, complete with automatic cooking modes.

Like its predecessor, the EB 333’s temperatures can still be set in increments as small as 5ºF, it still comes with standard convection and self-cleaning functions, and it can still fit an optional, built-in rotisserie.

One thing hasn’t changed: The 300 Series’ unique look. The oven is wider than it is tall, and retains the familiar front door with raised window. So, despite all that new technology, the EB 333 is still instantly recognizable as a Gaggenau.

read more here

More Appliance tips

General Appliance Tips

  • Unplug electronic appliances when not in use.
  • Upgrade your refrigerator if it is 10 years old or older. Refrigerators use more energy than any other appliance in your home, but an ENERGY STAR qualified refrigerator uses about half the energy of a 10-year old conventional model.
  • Clothes washers use energy to both clean clothes and heat water, so to save on energy costs, wash your clothes in cool water.
  • Run dishwashers only when you have a full load.
  • Use the air dry cycle on your dishwasher.
  • Use the oven less. Use microwaves, toaster ovens, and crockpots more often.

     

Appliance Safety Tips

When installing electrical appliances, keep in mind that most standard home electrical circuits are on a 120-volt line. Conventional outlets have two places to plug in devices and are called duplex outlets. It’s also important to note the quality level of your appliance’s) because the labor cost for installing more expensive equipment will be higher than for less expensive appliance’s).

Appliance installation and safety tips:

Appliance Power Requirements

Check the power requirements of each appliance. To run major appliances and heavy electrical equipment, you need 220-volt current in the house. And unless your clothes dryer runs on gas, it will require a 220-volt outlet to operate, so it’s necessary to upgrade to 220 to handle these and other heavy equipment.

Appliance Installation

When having an appliance installed be sure it can be removed easily for service. Flexible hook-ups for dishwashers and gas ranges can make repair jobs less labor intensive. Also, leave extra electric cable when installing electric wall ovens and cooktops. This will minimize the time the technician spends on the job and reduce the cost to you.
Some other appliance installation tips to keep in mind:

  • Dishwashers
    If your kitchen floor is being tiled, make sure that it is tiled beneath the dishwasher or at least raise its flooring to the same height as the tiles. Once down, there may not be enough clearance to remove the dishwasher for servicing. The only alternative will be to lift the whole countertop off of the cupboards, a needless expense.
  • Wall Ovens
    If you are installing a wall oven below countertop level, be aware that small children could be exposed to a burn hazard. Wall ovens do not have to conform to the same temperature standards that regular ranges do. This is because they are designed to be installed above counter height.
  • Washing Machines
    When installing a washing machine, be sure water shut-offs can be reached easily. Also ensure the water hoses are long enough to remove the appliance when necessary. A floor drain may also be necessary should the water pump or motor fail.
    Washing machines are designed to be used on solid flooring, like concrete. If it is being installed on a wooden floor, extra joist bracing may be needed. The mounting of an additional plywood section can also strengthen an existing wooden floor. Severe internal suspension damage can occur if used on unstable flooring.
  • Refrigerators
    Refrigerators with forced air condensers are the only kind that can be built in. Models with regular static condensers will not be able to dissipate the heat if used in this application. This will result in poor cooling efficiency and damage to the compressor. You can tell forced air models by the fan, located in the compressor compartment, used to circulate air through the condense.
    While major appliances make our lives much easier, they also pose significant risks if not maintained properly.
    The average homeowner has several thousand dollars invested in major appliances. To protect your investment and ensure many years of reliable service out of each it’s important to properly maintain your appliances.

Appliance Safety Tips

  • Extension Cords
    Extension cords pose several risks. First, the extension cord connections may not be secure. Besides causing power fluctuations that may damage the equipment, poor connections can also result in sparks that could start a fire.
    Another problem with the appliance connections is that they are vulnerable to water penetration. This is especially true in damp areas such as laundry rooms, bathrooms, kitchens, garages and outdoors. Water and electricity are a dangerous combination responsible for many avoidable deaths each year.
    People often make the mistake of using extension cords that are too small. The wires on extension cords are rated according to size, with lower ratings corresponding to larger sizes. A simple household extension cord for a lamp might have 16-gauge wire. An outdoor cord may have 14-gauge wire. Heavy-duty cords are usually 12-gauge.
    In general, in those circumstances where use of an extension cord is unavoidable, employ one that is heavier than the wires already attached to the appliance.
    Also, whenever using power tools or similar equipment on long extension cords, be aware that the longer the cord the more power that is lost en route. This phenomenon, called voltage drop, is much less pronounced in heavier wires. Whenever you use an inadequate cord, you run the risk of damaging the appliance or causing the wires to overheat and become a fire hazard.
    When extension cords, appliance wires and outlets are incompatible, people often use adapters to make things fit. Most commonly, people have a three-prong plug and a two-prong outlet. The third prong is the ground, and it offers important safety advantages. A much better long-run solution is to have an electrician replace your 2-prong outlets with properly grounded three-prong outlets.
    Heavy-duty appliances have plug configurations that are unique. Never use an adapter to fit these into more standard outlets.
  • Circuit Breakers and Fuses
    Older homes have fuse boxes while most new ones have circuit breakers. Both perform the same function. Whenever a short circuit or overload situation occurs, the device shuts off electricity to that circuit, preventing both shocks and fire hazards.
    Whenever an appliance stops working, first test the outlet with a lamp or radio. If the circuit is dead, turn off anything you know to be on the same circuit and go to your electrical box, usually located in the basement. If you have a circuit breaker, look for the one switch that is slightly out of alignment. Turn it off and turn it back on again. If you have a fuse box, replace the burnt-out fuse.
    If you try the appliance again and the circuit cuts off a second time, you may be overloading that circuit. Try the appliance in another part of the house. If it keeps causing circuits to cut off, something is wrong with the appliance. It may, for instance, have a short.
  • Pilot Lights
    Many older gas appliances (ranges, dryers, water heaters, furnaces, etc.) have pilot lights that run continuously. Newer models have electronic ignition instead.
    When an older appliance stops working, check to see if the pilot light has gone out. If it has, re-light it according to the instructions in the manual, which came with the unit or are printed on the appliance itself. In many cases, this will save you the cost of a repair call.
    Because pilot lights maintain a flame at all times, they are always ready to ignite any flammable gases that might be present. This is why you should never store paints, solvents and other chemicals anywhere near an appliance with a pilot light.

Self-Cleaning Oven Causing More Harm Than It Should

A self-cleaning oven uses temperatures as high as 900 degrees Fahrenheit to burn away any spilled food.

A self-cleaning oven sounds like a dream come true but is it more of a hassle than it is a convenience?

A self-cleaning ovens biggest plus is the convenience. You can relax and do other chores around the house while the oven cleans itself. Even though the oven reaches high temperatures, the thick insulation keeps the heat inside during the cleaning process, meaning the amount of energy used is reduced. Another advantage of a self-cleaning oven is you no longer need to buy expensive toxic oven cleaners. Using oven cleaners can leave a residue and when the oven is heated these fumes are released.

Of course, you also have your cons to a self-cleaning oven. Self-cleaning ovens can be very dangerous because the oven is left on an extended period and become hot to touch to children, pets, and adults. If you fail to remove heavy food debris before running the cycle, excessive smoke may fill your kitchen.

The self-cleaning oven also may cause mechanical failures. In new ovens you may find hidden heating elements underneath the oven floor and above the ceiling. These hidden heating elements makes it more difficult to vent heat and keep air circulating. With self-cleaning ovens getting as hot as they do it can lead to fuses popping and a burnt out control panel. Self-cleaning ovens have a special gasket that fits around the door of the oven.

After multiple uses of the self-cleaning feature, the gasket may break. When the gasket fails, it fills your kitchen with noxious fumes that are released from the oven cavity.

Oven Repair

Dining out as a treat or on special occasions to celebrate is a lot of fun. But going to a restaurant or picking up take out food every night just because your oven is broken gets old very quickly… not to mention expensive! When you need oven repair, you need it right away. Repairing your oven is much less expensive than buying a new one. You might be surprised how affordable it actually is.

If you live in San Francisco, or the surrounding areas, when you call Absolute Appliance Repair, we will quickly diagnose the problem with your oven and provide you with affordable repair options before we start any work. That way you have complete control of the repairs that will be completed, and you will know that we won’t break your budget for the month.

Our clean and friendly technicians will arrive at your house and get directly to work. They will diagnose the problem and let you know how they can help. Once you approve the work, they will make all of the necessary repairs. We also guarantee our work so you are fully covered if you should have any issues related to our repairs. At Absolute Appliance Repair we put our customers first. We work for you, to get your appliances, and your life, back to normal as quickly and economically as possible.

COUNT ON Absolute Appliance Repair TO SOLVE ANY APPLIANCE ISSUES

We provide San Francisco’s best appliance repair services, quickly and at a fair price. We stay up-to-date with the newest appliance technologies, and our expert service technicians can repair all major brands and models of household appliances.

We guarantee our work.

Absolute Appliances Repair is locally owned and operated.

We specialize in fixing refrigerators and freezers, washers and dryers, stoves, dishwashers, and any other type of electric appliance in your home.

When you depend on an appliance and it stops working, a fast repair is critically important. Using high-tech testing methods, we’ll quickly identify the root of the problem and advise you about the available repair options. That way, you can make the best choices.

Possible Oven Problems:

Possible Oven Problems:

  • Oven not reaching the correct cooking temperature.
  • Oven getting too hot and burning food.
  • Oven not turning on at all.
  • Oven lighting and/or power issues.
  • Broken oven heating element.
  • Damaged baking element.
  • Failing broiler element.
  • Oven thermostat issues.
  • Oven wiring problems.

Oven Tips

  • Cleaning the oven regularly and wiping up spills as they happen help your oven to work as efficiently as possible.
  • A solution of baking soda and vinegar cuts baked on grease and eliminate odor.

Absolute Appliance repair Gas Ovens, Stoves, Electric Ovens, Built-In Ovens, Combination Ovens, Convection Ovens, and Double Ovens.

Give us a call today at (415) 831-1259 to schedule an appointment for your oven repair!

How to Buy a Range

When deciding on a new range, here’s what you’ll need to know about features, style, price, and performance.

Today’s ranges cook more efficiently than their avocado ancestors thanks to fresh features and newfangled technologies. We separate the wheat from the chaff so you can pick the best range for your home.

First Things First: Gas or Electric?

If you don’t have a gas supply to your house, the answer is easy. But if you can go with either gas or electric, budget and cooking preferences play a significant role in deciding. Also, some people prefer electric ranges because of safety issues — there’s no chance of a gas leak. Here’s food for thought:

  • Popularity: Electric smooth-top ranges are the best sellers because of price and performance. They account for more than 60% of all ranges sold.
  • Budget: Electric ranges are typically less expensive than their gas counterparts. However, gas ranges are usually cheaper to operate, depending on whether your natural gas rates are lower than your electricity costs.
  • Cooking preferences: Listen to your inner chef. Many cooks prefer gas ranges because the burner flame works as a visual temperature gauge and can heat things up quickly. Most bakers prefer electric ovens because of the consistent and even heat they generate.

Here’s a surprising fact: There are no federal energy regulations for consumer ranges, so you won’t find a model that’s Energy Star certified.

Types of Ranges and Costs

There are three standard freestanding range types: electric, gas, and dual-fuel (a gas stovetop with an electric-powered oven). Each type includes:

  • A stovetop (with a minimum of four burners — many premium models have five)
  • An oven (usually two racks and one oven — many premium ranges will have a larger oven with three racks or two ovens)

If you want your range to look like it’s built into your cabinetry, there are two additional options. Both are somewhat rare and may require special ordering through an appliance dealer:

  • Slide-in ranges. The range fits between two cabinets and the edges of the cooktop rest on top of the counters, eliminating gaps. They’re available in gas, electric, and dual-fuel range styles.
  • Drop-in ranges. They‘re fitted into a pre-built cabinet opening with a cabinet panel across the bottom. The panel eliminates the bottom storage drawer typical of most ranges. They’re available in electric power only.

1. Electric ranges

Electric ranges feature three options for cooktop heating elements.

Coil-top models have exposed heating elements. Cookware goes directly on the elements. They’re the least expensive ranges you can buy ($389 to $650) and typically are available in only two colors: black or white. Features include:

  • Porcelain-enamel cooktop finish
  • Indicator lights that let you know when the burner’s coil heating element is on
  • Dials and knobs for oven and burner control

Coil-top ranges at the top end of the price range usually include:

  • Digital displays for heating temperatures and cooking times
  • Single storage drawers for cookware
  • Large oven windows

Drawbacks:

  • Coil heating elements are slow to heat up and cool.
  • Heating elements must be removed for thorough cleaning.
  • Indicator lights only go on when the cooktop’s coils are switched on, but not when the coils are off but still hot (and cooling down).
  • Coil cooktops tend to distribute heat unevenly.

Smooth-top models have solid disk or radiant heating elements beneath a one-piece ceramic glass cooktop that makes cleanup easy. Smooth tops are the best-selling ranges because of their performance, price, and good looks.

Mid-range models start at $550. Standard features typically include:

  • Standard electric ovens
  • Electronic oven controls with preset cooking options and digital displays
  • Indicator lights that let you know when the heating elements are on and when the surface area is hot and cooling down
  • Self-cleaning functions

Premium smooth-top ranges include fast-cooking convection ovens that use fans to circulate heat so foods bake or roast more quickly and evenly; they can slash cooking times by up to 30%. Premium models start at around $900 and typically include:

  • Hidden heating elements (rather than an exposed wire element sitting on the bottom of the oven’s interior) for easier oven cleaning
  • Warming centers that keep prepared foods warm
  • A fifth stovetop heating element

Smooth-top models with two ovens start at around $1,300.

Drawbacks:

  • Glass ceramic surfaces are a cinch to clean but prone to scratching.
  • You can’t use cast-iron, stoneware, or glass cookware on the cooktop because they can scratch. Also, glass and stoneware are poor heat conductors, which increases cooking time. The intense heat that cast iron creates can actually shut down the range. Stainless steel and copper are best.
  • Overheated metal cookware may bond with the cooktop’s glass ceramic surface.

Induction-top models are known for speedy stovetop cooking. Their burners don’t generate heat like other stovetops. Instead, they use magnetic technologies to turn compatible cookware into a heat source. If you can stick a magnet to your cookware, you can use it. As a result, the induction top’s glass ceramic surface remains cool to the touch.

Induction stovetops can boil water about 50% faster than other stoves. They’re also energy-efficient; 90% of the energy they generate is used to cook food (a standard electric stovetop uses about 65% and a gas stovetop uses 50%).

They’re typically equipped with convection ovens which speed cooking time by using fans to circulate and boost heat transfer. Prices range from $1,200 to $3,200. Induction ranges include:

  • Control lockouts that prevent the range from being accidentally turned on
  • Touch screens instead of knobs and dials
  • Hidden baking elements for easier cleaning
  • Warming drawers

Drawbacks:

  • Not all your pots and pans will be compatible with the induction stovetop. Aluminum, copper, glass, and some types of stainless cookware won’t work.
  • They’re expensive.

2. Gas ranges

Besides the visual control of the flame and quick, uniform heating, benefits include:

  • Compatibility with all cooktop and oven cookware
  • Surface burners and ovens that still work when the power goes out (but not a fan-driven convection feature)
  • Lower operating costs than electric ranges — depending on your local utility rates

Heat output for gas range burners is described in Btu (British thermal units). Burners range from 5,000 to 20,000 Btu. Ranges with high-heat burners usually cost more.

General retail price range: $399 to $5,300.

Standard models are the least expensive gas ranges you can buy and typically are available in two basic colors: black or white. Prices start at $399 and usually include the following features:

  • Porcelain-enamel cooktops
  • Burners that don’t burn as hot as more expensive ranges (average 9,500 Btu)
  • Storage drawers
  • Cast-iron grates over the burners
  • Dials and knobs for oven and burner control
  • Oven windows that are typically much smaller than those on more expensive models

Mid-range models start around $650. Features typically include:

  • High-performance burners (up to 12,500 Btu)
  • Digital settings for cooking times and temperatures
  • Storage drawers for pots and pans
  • Oven control lockouts that stop unintended changes to oven settings
  • A self-cleaning oven
  • Easy-to-clean steel grates over the burners
  • White, black, and stainless steel color options

Premium models start at around $1,000; double-oven-type gas ranges start at around $1,600. Features typically include:

  • High-performance burners (up to 17,000 Btu)
  • A bonus fifth burner
  • A removable stovetop griddle
  • Electronic control panels for programmed cooking times
  • Convection ovens
  • Hidden baking elements for easier cleaning

Pro-style models start at around $1,700. They’re wider than standard ranges and have large oven capacities of 5.8 cubic feet and more. Additional features typically include:

  • A bonus fifth burner, with one being a super-hot burner of up to 20,000 Btu
  • Two convection ovens
  • Heavy-duty rollout cooking racks
  • Multiple color and metal options

Drawbacks:

  • Gas ranges tend to be more expensive then their electric range counterparts.
  • You need a natural gas line hooked up to your kitchen.

3. Dual-fuel ranges

These ranges combine the best of both worlds: a gas stovetop that chefs love with an electric-powered oven that provides even heat for baking. They come with a premium price tag of $2,000 to $7,500.

Features include:

  • Gas stovetops with five burners
  • One or two electric convection ovens
  • Glass touch screens for burner and oven controls
  • Wi-Fi-enabled programming so you can control oven features with your personal device

Size Does Matter

Freestanding ranges typically fall into two conventional widths: Standard ranges are approximately 30 inches wide; dual-fuel and pro-style gas ranges are 36 to 48 inches wide.

You’ll need to make sure your range’s oven cavity size is large enough to accommodate your cooking needs:

  • 2 to 3 cubic feet will accommodate households with one or two people.
  • 3 to 4 cubic feet will accommodate households with three or four people.
  • 4 cubic feet and up will accommodate households of four or more.

Want to Color Your World?

Unlike refrigerators and clothes washers that are available in fashion-forward shades like ruby red or apple green, mid-range and premium ranges are typically available in shades of black, white, and stainless steel. You’ll have to look at pro-style ranges to get custom colors such as red, blue, and green.

Features and Functions You Should Have

We think the features that pack the most value for homeowners are the ones that boost convenience. Here’s a list of best bets:

Lots of rack positions so you can create room in your oven for additional or tall items when needed. Most ranges have five (yea!) but some lower-price ranges will not (boo!).

Hot surface lights on electric stovetops will let you know if the burner area is too hot to touch. You won’t find this feature on most coil-top electric ranges.

Double ovens will allow you to cook multiple items at different temperatures. Keep in mind you’ll sacrifice the convenient storage drawer for the extra oven.

A high heat burner is desirable for quickly heating up large quantities and for searing foods.

Warming drawers keep cooked foods warm prior to serving.

A self-cleaning cycle makes cleaning your oven less of a chore.

Sabbath mode settings allow observant Jews to preprogram oven settings so cooked foods remain warm during the Sabbath when cooking is forbidden.

Features You Shouldn’t Pay More For

You shouldn’t buy a range just because it has some of the following features. (Some features are standard on ranges with electronic screens.)

The delayed-start feature allows you to program your oven when to turn on, and Wi-Fi-enabled features allow you to control your oven when you’re not home.  The National Fire Protection Association says you should never operate your oven when you’re not home to check on it regularly.

Low-powered burners with extra-low settings aren’t necessary because burner output can be easily adjusted.

CONVENTIONAL vs. CONVECTION – oven comparison

CONVENTIONAL vs. CONVECTION Oven Comparison

If you are in the market for a new oven, there are two types that you can choose from conventional or convection. Consider the pros and cons before investing your money. Knowing and assessing the differences between the two will help you make the right choice that will work best for your needs and budget.

Heat Source

So what’s the difference (CONVENTIONAL vs. CONVECTION) ? Technically, all ovens cook by convection, where the hot interior air does the cooking. Standard or conventional ovens use natural convection and radiant heat to cook food. The burners heat the air inside the oven and transfer the heat to the surface of the food. With convection ovens, an insulating layer of air that is cooler than the overall interior of the oven surrounds the food. Convection ovens have an additional heating element and an extra motorized fan, which blows heated air throughout, diminishing the cooler air next to the food. A convection oven has upper, lower and back heating sources.

Internal Temperature

Regulating the internal temperature is easier with convection ovens because the fan circulates the hot air continuously. The third heating element located near or around the fan in the back of the oven heats the air to a uniform temperature before it enters the oven cavity. The balanced heat circulation prevents hot spots. Conventional ovens tend to have hot spots. Food on the bottom rack tends to overcook or burn because it is close to the heat source. In similar fashion, placing food near the top of the oven often overcooks it because it is close to the upper heat element. Furthermore, the rising heat tends to accumulate at the top. Placing food near the center of the oven will yield better cooking results.

Cooking Time

Foods cook much faster in convection ovens. Convection cooking speeds up the chemical reactions of food during cooking. Baked goods release steam quicker, roasted meats render fats sooner and sugars in vegetables caramelize faster. A convection oven cooks food 25 percent faster than a conventional oven.

Cooking Quality

Convection ovens cook food more evenly compared to conventional ovens. Meats cook faster with more juice retained inside. Convection ovens cook meats with deeper flavors, crispier edges and are tenderer inside. In some cases, cooking with conventional ovens can result in drier meats, with a burnt outer part and not cooked well inside. Convection ovens can cook different foods evenly in different pans on different racks at the same time without transferring tastes, while conventional ovens cannot.

Types

Conventional ovens come in two types — range and deck. A range oven, also known as the general-purpose oven, is a part of a cooking system. It usually has a stove on top and an oven at the bottom. Some models may come with an incorporated microwave or convection oven at the center. A range oven may use electric or gas heat source. Deck ovens save space. They can be freestanding or built-in. Deck ovens may use electric or gas heat source. You can choose from single, double or triple deck ovens. Convection ovens may come in a range or deck along conventional ovens to allow cooking preferences. There are also portable or countertop convection ovens that you can buy if you have a conventional oven but would like to use a convection oven to cook small amounts of food.

Price

Most convection ovens are pricier than conventional ovens; however, consumers find they quickly recoup the higher initial cost from the energy savings achieved with faster cooking time.

Call Absolute Appliance Repair NOW if you have any problems with your oven!

Phone lines

(415) 831-1259 San Francisco
(415) 388-0690 Marin County
(650) 525-0512 South SF / Daly City / Pacifica

 

 

Cooking with convection oven

Convection ovens—long a mainstay of professional kitchens—continue to gain popularity with home cooks, many of whom either opt for the compact countertop versions or purchase an oven with a convection setting. The allure of faster cooking times, evenly cooked food, and the oven’s improved energy efficiency is hard to ignore. However, for anyone new to cooking with convection ovens, there is a learning curve that often requires adjustments to either time or temperature—and sometimes both. If you’re trying to figure out how best to cook with your convection oven, we’ve got some helpful advice.

First, a few basic mechanics: A conventional oven uses radiant heat that emanates from the top and/or bottom surfaces. The result is usually an oven with hot and cold spots. What makes a convection oven stand apart is the internal fan that circulates hot air, creating an evenly heated environment for the food. The most obvious advantage to having a steady supply of heat surrounding and penetrating the food is that all your meat, produce, and baked goods will cook faster and brown more evenly.

Experts and manufacturers recommend adjusting any recipe in two ways: either by lowering the oven’s temperature by about 25 degrees or by shortening the cooking time by roughly a quarter. Follow the tips below and carefully monitor your first few attempts for browning, texture, and doneness. It may help to record the results—through trial and error, you will quickly get a sense of how your convection oven cooks and what further adjustments should be made.

 

cooking tips:

  • Air Supply

If the air cannot circulate over and around the food, your convection oven will be ineffective. Trays and baking pans with lower sides allow hot air to flow freely. Use shallow roasting pans and rimless cookie sheets when possible. Try to keep a two-inch clearance on all sides. Shelves should never be covered with aluminum foil. Trays and pans should be placed so they don’t hinder effective circulation.

  • Adjust the Recipe

Variables such as initial oven temperature, quantity of the food, desired level of doneness, and oven model will all affect cooking time. Experiment with your favorite recipes by either dropping the temperature by about 25 to 30°F or shortening the time (10 to 15 percent for cookies and up to 30 percent less for large roasts), or both. Consult your user manuals for specific advice.

  • Method Cooking

Roasting
Proteins: Fat renders rapidly, sealing in precious juices and leaving a crispy, uniformly brown skin without constant shifting and basting. Fruits and vegetables: The natural sugars start to caramelize more quickly, leaving centers that are creamy and moist, concentrated flavors, and edges that are crisp and golden.
recipe to try:
Roast Chicken and Root Vegetables with Mustard Rosemary Sauce

Baking
Butter releases steam almost immediately, making the dough rise higher. That means your baked goods will all be flakier, lighter, and loftier. For cookies, take advantage of all available shelf space by baking with several trays at once. Because the fan disperses heat throughout, you won’t have to rotate them as often.
recipe to try:
Chocolate Chip Cookies

Toasting/Drying
Nuts and grains: Achieve an even, golden hue with far less tossing and turning with a convection oven. Fruits and meats: The convection oven’s internal fan helps thinly sliced fruit and jerky dry out more quickly and uniformly than a dehydrator or a conventional oven does.

Extreme Granola